Bidding Adieu to 2011, Welcoming 2012

On behalf of the associates of our seven operation centers based on three continents, we extend our New Year greetings to Holtec International’s clients and suppliers – our vital stakeholders – who helped make 2011 a splendidly successful year for the Company.  In 2011, Holtec completed 25 years of operation with a proud record of continuously rising employment in our factories and offices fueled nearly entirely by the sale of new products and systems developed by the Company’s own engineers.  In its core business of spent fuel management, Holtec’s relationship base in wet and dry storage/transportation grew to over 120 nuclear plants around the globe. Holtec’s committed and derivative backlog across all product lines offered by the Company now exceeds $5 billion.  In 2011, Holtec became the first company to establish a comprehensive training center for dry storage implementation and in November became the first company to complete a Client Assisted Turnkey dry storage project (at Waterford). The second Client Assisted Turnkey dry storage project, at Comanche Peak, is scheduled begin the final phase of the project, fuel loading of 12 HI-STORM systems, in February of 2012 (dry runs were completed July 2011).

Holtec Sponsors an Exhibit to Foster Public Awareness of Dry Storage at PSEG’S Energy & Environmental Resource Center

Last month a new exhibit sponsored by Holtec International was unveiled at the PSEG Energy & Environmental Resource Center (EERC) located near the Salem and Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Stations in Salem, New Jersey (see photos on next page). The EERC is a community learning center focused on fostering an improved understanding of energy, environmental challenges and strategies for balancing energy demand with environmental stewardship. The center opened in January 2010 and has already hosted over 10,000 visitors.

Holtec Training Center for Improving Human Performance in Pool-to-Pad Loading Operations to Open Next Month

We are pleased to announce that the Holtec Training Center for used fuel outage implementation, long in the making, is nearing completion. The Training Center is housed at the Holtec Manufacturing Division (HMD), a 460,000 sq. feet, ASME Code Section III fabrication facility located in east Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Holtec is the only provider of dry spent fuel storage systems that manufactures 100% of its equipment destined for domestic clients in the United States. Holtec is also America’s largest exporter of manufactured SSCs to foreign markets, generating much needed manufacturing jobs in our country.

Holtec Manufacturing Division Attains New Plateaus of Safety, Quality and Punctuality

Rectangular Steam Surface Condenser Undergoing Final Shop Tests
Rectangular Steam Surface Condenser Undergoing Final Shop Tests

We are proud to announce that our Pittsburgh based Holtec Manufacturing Division’s (HMD) on-time delivery of capital equipment has reached a record high of over 98% in 2011. This record of on-time shipment applies to both nuclear components as well as to the commercial ASME Code equipment, which includes large Surface Condensers and Feedwater Heaters fabricated for our Power Plant Component Division (PPCD) which is a leading global supplier of capital heat transfer equipment. Photos of recently delivered heat exchanger equipment, some mammoth in size and weight, are shown below.

Chernobyl’s Director General Shares His Perspective On Fukushima

As our readers are aware, Holtec International is tasked with placing Chernobyl’s 21,217 fuel assemblies in dry storage for the 100-year service life. The Chernobyl dry storage project is a multi-national donor funded project administered by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD). Holtec Highlights interviewed Mr. Igor Gramotkin, Chernobyl’s Director General, to seek his insights in decommissioning a stricken plant that might be valuable in tackling the challenges at Fukushima. (Japan is a donor country involved in funding the Chernobyl Project.)

Memo to Water Challenged Power Plants: Please Meet HI-VACC

HI-VACC 140 MWe Steam Turbine 100 ft x 200 ft; Total Footprint Area = 20,000 sq ft.
HI-VACC 140 MWe Steam Turbine 100 ft x 200 ft; Total Footprint Area = 20,000 sq ft.

The laws of nature dictate that over 60 percent of the thermal energy produced by a steam power plant must be rejected to the environment. The local source of natural water is the usual recipient of this “waste” heat. The rejection of the plant’s waste heat to the air, in lieu of water, has thus far been challenging because of the large land area and capital cost associated with conventional air cooled condensers (ACCs) – until now. Holtec’s R&D team proudly announces the successful development of a whole new genré of ACCs that require less than half of the land area of a conventional “A- frame” ACC (see illustration) presently sold by Holtec and other world suppliers. In contrast to the conventional ACCs made of carbon steel tubes with brazed aluminum fins, the new ACC features stainless steel tubes resulting in significantly reduced flow accelerated corrosion and iron transport problems that currently plague the ACC industry. The conventional A-frame ACC, shown below with HI- VACC for identical heat duty, illustrates the reduction in the system footprint area achieved by the latter.

Three Years!

We are pleased to report that Holtec International will submit a license amendment request (LAR) by Labor Day 2011 to enable the transfer of high burnup fuel with as little as three years cooling from the spent fuel pools into dry storage. This LAR will be submitted on the docket for Holtec’s HI-STORM FW MPC Storage System.  As we reported earlier (Holtec Highlights 26.09), the HI-STORM FW MPC Storage System received its initial Certificate of Compliance from the USNRC on June 13, 2011 (USNRC Docket No. 72-1032). The presently approved certificate contains one regionalized heat load pattern for the MPC-37 and one for the MPC-89 and focuses on plants that have a broad mix of “new” and “old” spent fuel assemblies in their spent fuel pools.